Partner Support and Impact on Birth Outcomes among Teen Pregnancies in the United States

Partner-Support-and-Impact-on-Birth-Outcomes-among-Teen-Pregnancies-in-the-United-States

Partner Support and Impact on Birth Outcomes among Teen Pregnancies in the United States (click to see the original article)

Purpose: Despite hypothesized relationships between lack of partner support during a woman’s pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes, few studies have examined partner support among teens. We examined a potential proxy measure of partner support and its impact on adverse birth outcomes (low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth (PTB) and pregnancy loss) among women who have had a teenage pregnancy in the United States.

Methods: In a secondary data analysis utilizing cross-sectional data from 5609 women who experienced a teen pregnancy from the 2006 – 2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), we examined an alternative measure of partner support and its impact on adverse birth outcomes. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess differences in women who were teens at time of conception who had partner support during their pregnancy and those who did not, and their birth outcomes.

Results: Even after controlling for potential confounding factors, women with a supportive partner were 63% less likely to experience LBW [aOR: 0.37, 95% CI: (0.26 – 0.54)] and nearly 2 times less likely to have pregnancy loss [aOR: 0.48, 95% CI: (0.32 – 0.72)] compared to those with no partner support.

Conclusions: Having partner support or involvement during a teenager’s pregnancy may reduce the likelihood of having a poor birth outcome.