Women and Children's Health in the News

Breastfeeding may lower risk of MS study Says

August 4th, 2017 Women with a longer history of breastfeeding may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than mothers who skip breastfeeding or nurse for briefer periods, a new study suggests. Researchers compared nearly 400 women with MS or its precursor, known… read more

Your ZIP Code Might Be As Important To Health As Your Genetic Code

August 4th, 2017 When a receptionist hands out a form to fill out at a doctor’s office, the questions are usually about medical issues: What’s the visit for? Are you allergic to anything? Up to date on vaccines? But some health organizations are… read more

Black Women Are Suffering From Alzheimer's Disease And Nobody's Talking About It

August 4th, 2017 My grandmother had a morning ritual: She’d wake up around 6 a.m.; have some variation of coffee, crackers and sausage for breakfast; and then watch the Channel 4 news. Later, she would drive to the gas station for a few… read more

Women With High-Risk Pregnancies Are More Likely To Develop Heart Disease

August 4th, 2017 Women who have high-risk pregnancies or complications in childbirth are up to eight times more likely to have heart disease later in life, statistics suggest. But many mothers – and their doctors – are unaware of the danger. Emerging research… read more

OWH News: Opioids and Women Final Report Released

August 2nd, 2017 Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office on Women’s Health (OWH) released the Final Report: Opioid Use, Misuse, and Overdose in Women. The report examines the prevention, treatment, and recovery issues for women who misuse, have… read more

Low sodium diet might not lower blood pressure according to a new study

August 1st, 2017 According to an article published in the Science Daily, a new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn’t associated with lower blood pressure. The new findings call into question… read more

Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald is named new CDC director

July 10th, 2017 Georgia’s public health commissioner, an OB-GYN and two-time Republican candidate for Congress, has been named the next director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. read more read more

Extreme opioid use and doctor shopping still plague medicare

July 4th, 2017 In Washington, D.C., a Medicare beneficiary filled prescriptions for 2,330 pills of oxycodone, hydromorphone, and morphine in a single month last year, written by just one of the 42 health providers who prescribed the person such drugs. In Illinois, a… read more

Study explains why Zika may not take root in US

June 14th, 2017 by Keith Brannon As we head into peak mosquito season this summer, a recent study involving a Tulane University researcher has some good news for those worried about Zika. Vigorous mosquito control efforts were able to keep the virus from… read more

Public health school asks How do we undo racism in practice

June 2nd, 2017 New initiatives at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine are focusing on revising the way racial health disparities are discussed, studied and taught in the classroom and beyond. “All of these discussions and workshops aim to elevate… read more

Childhood obesity causes lasting damage to the body according to a new study

May 30th, 2017 Obesity in childhood has long-term health implications stretching into adulthood, a new study in the journal Obesity Reviews reveals. Examining data collected from over 300,000 participants across 18 studies, researchers from the University of Surrey identified increased arterial damage and… read more

The benefits of paid leave for children are real, majority of research says

April 7th, 2017 From the paid parental leave one-upmanship by Silicon Valley companies to Democratic presidential candidates calling for guaranteed paid leave to Republicans arguing mandated paid leave could drive small businesses out of business, the issue is getting more attention in the… read more

Forcing People At Vending Machines To Wait Nudges Them To Buy Healthier Snacks

March 31st, 2017 If you wanted a bag of Doritos from one of Brad Appelhans’ experimental vending machines, you’d have to wait. The associate professor of preventative medicine at Rush University Medical Center designed a device that fits inside of vending machines and… read more

MAC Dissemination and Advocacy

March 31st, 2017 MAC faculty and staff are broadening their reach and dissemination capacity in work that supports the health and well-being of women, children, and families. Our research identifies and addresses how social environments may explain many of the health disparities we… read more

Study links social media use to isolation in young adults

March 31st, 2017 One of the most deeply felt ironies of social media is that it is kind of a lie. The person we pretend to be is disconnected from the person that is; the bustling lives of others we like and scroll… read more

Medicines and Pregnancy: 4 Tips to Help You Get the Facts

March 31st, 2017 March 20, 2017 • By Kimberly A. Thomas, M.P.H., Director of Outreach and Communications, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Office of Women’s Health My first and only pregnancy was a very difficult one. I was on bed rest for… read more

Editorial: The 2017 Womens March on Washington

March 29th, 2017 On January 21, 2017, over half a million men and women filled the streets of downtown Washington DC as for the Women’s March on Washington, one of the largest protests in US history. Held on the day after the inauguration… read more

Parental obesity linked to delays in child development, NIH study suggests

January 5th, 2017 Children of obese parents may be at risk for developmental delays, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. The investigators found that children of obese mothers were more likely to fail tests of fine motor… read more

American Express Is Giving Workers 20 Weeks of Parental Leave and $35,000 for Infertility Treatment

December 13th, 2016 Add American Express to the growing list of companies that are sweetening their parental leave and employee benefits. The financial services company announced Monday that it is giving men and women 20 weeks of fully-paid leave after welcoming a child… read more

Tulane research shows the association between neighborhood violence and biological stress in children

November 17th, 2016 There is an association between neighborhood violence and biological stress in children according to research by Katherine P. Theall, Ph.D., Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Director of the Mary Amelia Women’s Center at Tulane. This… read more

An Analysis of Paid Family and Sick Leave Advocacy in Louisiana: Lessons Learned

September 16th, 2016 Policy Matters, An Analysis of Paid Family and Sick Leave Advocacy in Louisiana: Lessons Learned, by “Phyllis Hutton Raabe, PhD“ and Katherine P. Theall, PhD, of Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and the Mary Amelia Women’s Center,… read more

Iowa Researcher Looks at Effects of Higher Minimum Wage on Infant Birthweight

July 18th, 2016 A new study suggests that increasing the minimum wage would lead to an increase in birthweight among babies born to women with low education. The research team included Dr. George Wehby, associate professor of health management and policy at the… read more

Lecture shows a new way to study urban violence

July 6th, 2016 Photo by Sally Asher A book from the 1950s helped form Douglas Wiebe’s study of gun violence. One Boy’s Day, an examination of a Midwestern boy’s footsteps and behaviors over 14 hours, prompted Wiebe, over 50 years later, to track… read more

The Supreme Court Struck Down Texas Abortion Restrictions

June 28th, 2016 WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court on Monday reaffirmed and strengthened constitutional protections for abortion rights, striking down parts of a restrictive Texas law that could have drastically reduced the number of abortion clinics in the state, leaving them only in… read more

San Francisco becomes first US city to mandate fully paid parental leave

April 7th, 2016 San Francisco has become the first US municipality to mandate employers offer fully paid parental leave, and activists hope the progressive new law will pave the way for policies across the country that allow parents to take time off and… read more

Louisiana Senate panel advances minimum wage, equal pay bills

April 1st, 2016 With governor’s urging, Louisiana Senate panel advances minimum wage, equal pay bills A state Senate panel advanced legislation Thursday to establish a minimum wage and to pay men and women equally after Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards appeared before the… read more

Bio-molecules in human breast milk stop inflammation

October 26th, 2015 BWH researchers investigate the protective health properties of breast milk Source: Brigham and Women’s Hospital Summary: Human breast milk, which provides essential nutrients and antibodies to newborns, has long been known to play an important role in infant development and… read more

American Cancer Society Releases New Breast Cancer Guideline

October 23rd, 2015 Article date: October 20, 2015 By Stacy Simon The American Cancer Society has released new guidelines for breast cancer screening. Among the changes, the new recommendations say all women should begin having yearly mammograms at age 45, and can change… read more

Minnesota Study Finds Fewer Than Half of Breastfeeding Mothers Have Access to Basic Accommodations to Express Breast Milk at Work

October 19th, 2015 A new study from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota finds that only 40 percent of new mothers who were breastfeeding their babies had access to both adequate break time and private space, which was not… read more

What does it mean when more than 45 percent of Louisiana's workers cannot earn a single paid sick day?

August 6th, 2015 What Does It Mean When More Than 45 Percent of Louisiana’s Workers Cannot Earn a Single Paid Sick Day? New Fact Sheet Examines Impact on Workers, Families and the Economy in the State A new fact sheet sheet on Louisiana’s… read more

Louisiana's infectious disease outbreaks often go unreported

July 20th, 2015 Children started appearing at the hospital with symptoms of viral meningitis — headache, fever, lack of appetite, stiff neck. The first one came on May 6. Nine days later, another. The next day, a third. By June 22, 16 children… read more

Supreme Court ruling on health care law hailed as victory for many in Louisiana

June 25th, 2015 For the nearly 138,000 Louisianians who receive federal subsidies through the Affordable Care Act, Thursday’s (June 25) decision by the U.S. Supreme Court upholding the legality of those payments brought a huge sense of relief. “I think it’s very, very,… read more

FDA removes artificial trans fat from nation's food supply

June 17th, 2015 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced its final determination that partially hydrogenated oil, commonly known as trans fat, is no longer “generally recognized as safe.” The action, according to Acting FDA Commissioner Stephen Ostroff, MD, “is expected to… read more

MAC, a Legislative Resource

June 1st, 2015 Currently, most U.S. workers lack access to paid sick and family and medical leaves to care for themselves and their families. Only 12% of private sector workers have access to paid family leave and nearly 40% of the workforce does… read more

MAC Becomes a Legislative Resource

May 28th, 2015 Currently, most U.S. workers lack access to paid sick and family and medical leaves to care for themselves and their families. Only 12% of private sector workers have access to paid family leave and nearly 40% of the workforce does… read more

May 28th, 2015 MAC is abuzz with the addition of 24 new Breastfeeding-Friendly Workplaces (BFW) to its list of businesses that support breastfeeding moms who have returned to work. Earning the distinction of Breastfeeding Friendly means they comply with the US Patient Protection… read more

The Jane Wilson Smith Spring Lecture Series - Making an impact

May 28th, 2015 Pictured above are :Drs. Chloe Bird, Rand Corp; Kat Theall- SPHTM ,MAC Director; Phyllis Raabe, SPHTM and Heidi Hartmann, IWPR founder This year’s JWS Spring talks were instrumental in addressing two powerful issues of local, state and national concern: sexual… read more

Extraordinary: Facebook Says 'Not On Our Watch' to Poverty Wages, Family Unfriendly Policies

May 18th, 2015 Wow. An announcement by Facebook marks the dawn of a new day in this country. At a time when federal lawmakers are dragging their feet on fair and family friendly workplace policies, corporate America is beginning to step up by… read more

Too few minority women breastfeed -- can ob/gyns change their minds?

April 20th, 2015 Obstetricians and gynecologists have a unique opportunity to educate and encourage minority women to nurse their infants to help reduce persistent racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding. As part of prenatal care, ob/gyns should promote the known health benefits of… read more

Supreme Court Rules Against UPS in Pregnancy Discrimination Case

April 1st, 2015 The Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled in favor of a worker suing her employer for putting her on unpaid leave while she was pregnant, rejecting opposing arguments presented by her and her employers and finding an alternative reason that her… read more

Hartmann talk on paid leaves gains support from Senator Karen Carter Peterson

March 30th, 2015 Drs. Chloe Bird, Rand Corp; Kat Theall, MAC Director; Phyllis Raabe, SPHTM and Hartmann chat after the lecture Heidi Hartmann, President and Founder of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, lectured on the health and economic benefits of sick and… read more

Sexual aggression: a public health problem

March 11th, 2015 March 6, 2015 The Mary Amelia Women’s Health Center at Tulane and the Newcomb College Institute are sponsoring a talk on Wednesday (March 11) by Kevin Swartout, a researcher on violence against women, on the subject of sexual assault on… read more

New Orleans Kids, Working Parents, and Poverty

March 5th, 2015 What is the overall condition of New Orleans children? We know that by looking at the data, 39 percent of New Orleans children live in poverty , a full 17 percentage points higher than the US average. We also know… read more

Feeding Babies Peanut Snacks Can Help Them Avoid Future Allergies

February 24th, 2015 Introducing peanut-containing foods into the diets of babies – including those prone to allergies – is a safe practice and drastically reduces their risk of developing peanut allergies later on, according to a landmark clinical trial published online Monday in… read more

HHS awards $386 million to support families through the home visiting program

February 19th, 2015 Program invests in America’s youngest children Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell today announced $386 million in grant awards to states, territories, and nonprofit organizations to support the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (Home Visiting… read more

City Council passes smoking ban

January 22nd, 2015 NEW ORLEANS — The City Council passed an ordinance banning smoking in many places throughout the city including bars, restaurants and casinos. The council voted unanimously on the ordinance brought forth by Councilwoman LaToya Cantrell. The meeting was highlighted by… read more

BPA exposure may increase miscarriage risk in pregnant women

January 21st, 2015 Exposure to the BPA chemical, which is commonly found in food packaging, may increase miscarriage risk in pregnant women. A new study presented Oct. 14 at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine’s (ASRM) annual meeting in Boston found women with… read more

Nursing Mothers Granted Tax Break

January 21st, 2015 Great news! Nursing moms are getting a new tax break from the IRS for breast pumps and other supplies. The same proposal was rejected in 2010 because the IRS didn’t think breastfeeding had enough benefits to be considered medical care.… read more

President Obama to propose paid sick leave for employees

January 15th, 2015 WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama Thursday will call on Congress to pass stalled legislation requiring companies with 15 or more workers to offer up to seven days of paid sick leave annually. He’ll also announce that he is directing federal… read more

Safe streets lead to more walking and biking to school

January 15th, 2015 More students walk or bike to school when surroundings streets, sidewalks and crosswalks are safe and attractive, according to a Tulane University study published in the Journal of School Health this month. “Our study found a clear connection between features… read more

Practice to Policy: How Louisiana Revamped Its Approach to Preschool

January 8th, 2015 By Sherryl Heller, PhD (Associate Professor, Tulane University School of Medicine) and Allison Boothe, PhD (Assistant Professor, Tulane University School of Medicine) Preschool expulsion is both detrimental and prevalent. The good news is that we can prevent preschool expulsion through… read more

New Orleans city workers now eligible for paid maternity, parental leave

December 15th, 2014 New parents working for the city of New Orleans will be entitled to paid parental leave, rather than having to solicit “leave donations” from co-workers, thanks to a new set of rules approved by the Civil Service Commission Monday (Dec.… read more

Mayor Mitch Landrieu announces Blueprint for Safety new domestic violence program

October 22nd, 2014 A seemingly minor domestic fight can be indicative of a violent relationship that could end a victim’s life, advocates said Tuesday, as they joined New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu in unveiling a new initiative aimed at identifying and prioritizing those… read more

DC Government Begins New Paid Family Leave Program

October 10th, 2014 Mayor Gray welcomes federal grant to study expanding paid family leave to private sector (Washington, DC) Mayor Vincent C. Gray, following through on the commitment he made in his 2014 State of the District Address, today announced that the District… read more

Recent NFL case brings focus to corporal punishment debate

September 19th, 2014 Following Minnesota Vikings’ Adrian Peterson’s indictment on charges of abusing his child, there is a renewed debate over how parents discipline their children. Jonathan Capehart and our partner, Dr. Stacy Drury discuss. Watch the interview here read more

Louisiana getting four 'Healthy Start' grants to combat high infant mortality rates

September 17th, 2014 With the goal of reducing the nation’s high infant mortality rates, the Obama administration is awarding $65 million in “Healthy Start” grants to 87 organizations, including four in Louisiana. Read more here read more

Family violence leaves genetic imprint on children

June 18th, 2014 A new Tulane University School of Medicine study finds that the more fractured families are by domestic violence or trauma, the more likely that children will bear the scars down to their DNA. Researchers discovered that children in homes affected… read more

The Association of Telomere Length With Family Violence and Disruption

June 18th, 2014 The Association of Telomere Length With Family Violence and Disruption (click to read the paper) Authors: Stacy S. Drury, MD, PhD, Emily Mabile, BA, Zoë H. Brett, PhD, Kyle Esteves, BA, Edward Jones, BA, Elizabeth A. Shirtcliff, PhD, and Katherine… read more

The Louisiana Women's Policy & Research Commission releases it's 2013 report

May 6th, 2014 The Louisiana Women’s Policy & Research Commission 2013 Report to the Governor has just been released. This annual report examines the status of Louisiana women by evaluating their economic, education, and health issues, analyzing trends that impact women’s health and… read more

Supporting a higher minimum wage to promote public health: Letter

April 9th, 2014 The field of public health increasingly recognizes the role of social determinants such as poverty, low incomes, low education and inequality in leading to negative public health outcomes. Much research shows associations between these factors and higher rates of cardio-vascular… read more

February 10th, 2014 San Fransico Pediatrician on How ‘Toxic Stress’ Affects Children’s Health, Education (click to view the original article) Poverty sucks. By almost any measure, people living in poor neighborhoods, especially children, get the short end of the stick. They’re exposed to… read more

Partner Support and Impact on Birth Outcomes among Teen Pregnancies in the United States

January 6th, 2014 Partner Support and Impact on Birth Outcomes among Teen Pregnancies in the United States (click to see the original article) Purpose: Despite hypothesized relationships between lack of partner support during a woman’s pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes, few studies have… read more

The Link Between Early Childhood Experiences and a Lifetime of Poor Outcomes

December 17th, 2013 The Link Between Early Childhood Experiences and a Lifetime of Poor Outcomes – Altarum Institute (click to see the original article) Recently, nine-year-old Jay was rough-housing with a group of teammates during a sporting event when the playful scenario transformed… read more

Two local hospitals join effort to promote breastfeeding

December 5th, 2013 Two local hospitals join effort to promote breastfeeding – The New Orleans Advocate (click to see the original article) There were no sweetly swaddled newborn babies to admire Wednesday morning in the nursery of East Jefferson General Hospital. And that’s… read more

Bad eating habits start in the womb

December 1st, 2013 Bad eating habits start in the womb – The New York Times (click to see the original article) The solution to one of America’s most vexing problems – our soaring rates of obesity and diet-related diseases – may have its… read more

Living in disordered neighborhoods gets under the skin

November 12th, 2013 Living in disordered neighborhoods gets under the skin (click to see the original article) Living in a violence-plagued neighborhood may cause such great stress that a person’s gene expression may be altered. These are the findings of Katherine Theall, Stacy… read more

Higher breastfeeding rates likely with early skin-to-skin contact

October 30th, 2013 Higher breastfeeding rates likely with early skin-to-skin contact – Medical News Today (click to see the original article) Skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant in the delivery room is associated with an increased likelihood for exclusive breastfeeding, according to an… read more

Louisiana the worst state for women, report says

September 25th, 2013 Louisiana the worst state for women, report says – Greater Baton Rouge Business Report (click to see the original article) Higher than average poverty, as well as fewer leadership opportunities and health care options make Louisiana the worst state a… read more

To Succeed at Breast Feeding, Most New Moms Could Use Help

September 23rd, 2013 To Succeed at Breast Feeding, Most New Moms Could Use Help – NPR (click to see the original article) The majority of new mothers try to breast-feed. But it’s not easy. Only 13 percent manage to breast-feed exclusively for the… read more

Pumping Rooms Aid Local Mothers

September 17th, 2013 Pumping Rooms Aid Local Mothers – WDSU News (click to see the original article) We are so excited to see our very own Caitrin Alb on the news talking about the pumping room set up for mother’s at Charity School… read more

Prenatal Smoke Exposure May Impact Children's Chromosomes

September 5th, 2013 Prenatal Smoke Exposure May Impact Children’s Chromosomes – Tulane New Wave (click to see the original article) A new study published in the American Journal of Public Health finds prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke can impact parts of chromosomes in… read more

Many Drugs Found Safe for Breast-Feeding Mothers

August 26th, 2013 Many Drugs Found Safe for Breast-Feeding Mothers – The Wall Street Journal (click to see the original article) Breast-feeding mothers can take most prescription drugs without risking their babies’ health, though they should try to avoid certain painkillers, psychiatric drugs… read more

Women's Equality Day

August 26th, 2013 What is Women’s Equality Day? At the behest of Rep. Bella Abzug (D-NY), in 1971 the U.S. Congress designated August 26 as “Women’s Equality Day.” The date was selected to commemorate the 1920 passage of the 19th Amendment to the… read more

Breastfeeding in Non-Traditional Occupations is Key to Improving Access to Higher-Paying Skilled Careers

August 22nd, 2013 Breastfeeding in Non-traditional Occupations is Key to Improving Access to Higher-Paying, Skilled Careers – Huffington Post (click to see original article) August is National Breastfeeding Month. This is a great opportunity for employers of women in non-traditional occupations to take… read more

Early Hits and Long-Term Consequences: Tracking the Lasting Impact of Prenatal Smoke Exposure on Telomere Length in Children

August 8th, 2013 Early Hits and Long-Term Consequences: Tracking the Lasting Impact of Prenatal Smoke Exposure on Telomere Length in Children (click to see original article) Authors: Katherine P Theall, PhD, Sarah McKasson, MPH, Emily Mabile, MPH, Lauren F. Dunaway, MPH, and Stacy… read more

Got Milk?

August 6th, 2013 Got Milk? – The Advocate (click to see original article) Experts agree that for babies, breast is best. But for some moms and babies, traditional breastfeeding doesn’t work. The good news is that, with a little work and an electric… read more

World Breastfeeding Week 2013: The Workplace and Employment Circle of Support

August 1st, 2013 World Breastfeeding Week 2013: The Workplace and Employment Circle of Support – Lactation Matters (click to see original article) This is a blog post from Lactation Matters (the official blog of the International Lactation Consultant Association). The first week of… read more

Louisiana Improves in Annual Federal Breastfeeding Rankings

August 1st, 2013 Louisiana Improves in Annual Federal Breastfeeding Rankings, Improves Rate of Breastfeeding in Infants to more than Sixty Percent: Health Department Celebrates Improvement, Emphasizes Benefits to Moms, Babies During World Breastfeeding Month – DHH (click to see original article) According to… read more

More Moms Are Breast-Feeding But Many Babies Still Miss Out

July 31st, 2013 More Moms are Breast-Feeding, But Many Babies Still Miss Out – NPR (click to see original article) According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), three quarters of new mothers gave breast-feeding a try in 2010, and mothers… read more

Women as a Force for Change

July 31st, 2013 Women as a Force for Change – The New York Times (click to see original article) This article is about “women’s empowerment,” which has become a buzz phrase in the last few years. However, some people are pushing back. They… read more

More Evidence That Breast-Feeding May Boost Babies' IQs

July 29th, 2013 More Evidence That Breast-Feeding May Boost Babies’ IQs – USA Today (click to see original article) There’s strong evidence that breast-feeding during infancy provides babies with many health benefits, from decreasing gastrointestinal tract infections and middle ear infections to reducing… read more

Infant Feeding and Childhood Cognition at Ages 3 and 7 Years: Effects of Breastfeeding Duration and Exclusivity

July 29th, 2013 Infant Feeding and Childhood Cognition at Ages 3 and 7 Years: Effects of Breastfeeding Duration and Exclusivity (click to see original article) Authors: Mandy B. Belfort, MD, MPH; Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman, MPH; Ken P. Kleinman, ScD; Lauren B. Guthrie, MPH;… read more

Lindy Boggs, Former Congresswoman and Vatican Ambassador, Dies at 97

July 27th, 2013 Lindy Boggs, Former Congresswoman and Vatican Ambassador, Dies at 97 – WWLTV (click to see original article) Lindy Boggs, the lifelong public servant and iconic Southern woman who became the first Louisiana female elected to the U.S. Congress and first… read more

July 24th, 2013 Why Breast Cancer Kills More Black Women: They’re Sicker – NBC (click to see original article) According to this article, doctors and policymakers have known for years that African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer than white… read more

Breastfeeding Note From Pizza Waitress Pays It Forward

July 18th, 2013 Breastfeeding Note From Pizza Waitress Pays It Forward – Yahoo! (click to see original article) This article is about a mother, Jackie-Johnson Smith, who was breastfeeding her child in a restaurant. To her surprise, the waitress paid for one of… read more

Breastfeeding Mothers Need Support and Encouragement

July 15th, 2013 Breastfeeding Mothers Need Support and Encouragement – Medical News Today (click to see original article) This article claims that more support is needed to help women overcome doubts in the hope that they will breastfeed their babies for longer. The… read more

One Simple Guideline That Could Reduce America's High Infant Mortality Rate

July 5th, 2013 One Simple Guideline That Could Reduce America’s High Infant Mortality Rate – PBS (click to see original article) This article contains an interview with Premier healthcare alliance’s CEO Susan DeVore. She discussed how hospitals can help lower the infant mortality… read more

Country Club Snubs Breastfeeding Mom

July 1st, 2013 Country Club Snubs Breastfeeding Mom – Yahoo! (click to see original article) This article is about Roseline Remans, wife of Belgian diplomat Tom Neijens, who started breastfeeding their daughter on the terrace of the Metropolis Country Club in White Plains… read more

Improving Breastfeeding at Work: Is it Possible?

July 1st, 2013 Improving Breastfeeding at Work: Is it Possible? – Huffington Post (click to see the original article) This article is about the Supporting Working Mothers Act of 2013 (SWMA). This bill focuses on breastfeeding policies in the workplace and expands upon… read more

American Way of Birth, Costliest in the World

June 30th, 2013 American Way of Birth, Costliest in the World – The New York Times (click to see the original article) This article is about the rising of maternity services in the United States. Charges for delivery have about tripled since 1996… read more

Neighborhood disorder and telomeres: Connecting children's exposure to community level stress and cellular response

May 1st, 2013 Neighborhood disorder and telomeres: Connecting children’s exposure to community level stress and cellular response (click to see original article) Authors: Katherine P. Theall, Zoe H. Brett, Elizabeth A. Shirtcliff, Erin C. Dunn, Stacy S. Drury Source: Social Science & Medicine,… read more

The Question Is Not: "Is Race or Class More Important?"

December 1st, 2005 The Question Is Not: ‘Is Race or Class More Important?’ (click to see original article) Author: Dr. Paula Braveman Source: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1979-), Vol. 59, No. 12 (Dec., 2005),p. 1029 In this short article, Dr. Braveman… read more